Home Business BDAmbassadors: Gerard Wyvill & Kari Arbouin
BDAmbassadors: Gerard Wyvill & Kari Arbouin

BDAmbassadors: Gerard Wyvill & Kari Arbouin

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THESE LEADERS ARE AT THE FOREFRONT OF INNOVATION AND DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THEIR FIELD. STRIVING TO IMPROVE NOT ONLY THEIR OWN BUSINESS, BUT OUR CITY’S PROSPERITY AS A WHOLE. OUR BDAMBASSADORS WILL BRING YOU REGULAR UPDATES ON THE LATEST NEWS, ADVANCES AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENTS WITHIN THEIR INDUSTRIES. THIS ISSUE WE SPEAK WITH HEALTH AMBASSADOR GERARD WYVILL AND EDUCATION AMBASSADOR KARI ARBOUIN.


Gerard Wyvill / CEO – Mater Health Services NQ

As a not-for-profit Catholic health service, the Mater believes people in the North deserve the same high level of facilities and services offered in major metropolitan cities and should be able receive them without the need for travel.

Travelling a long way from your home town for a hospital stay not only creates additional financial pressure on patients, it also increases the emotional strain when your network of family and friends are not close by.

The Mater has recently begun Stage 1 of the $52 million Pimlico Campus expansion project which will deliver private hospital facilities and services which will be equal to, or better than, any private hospital in Australia.

The expansion includes the latest state-of-the-art digital operating theatres, a new Day Surgery Unit, expanded X-Ray facilities and a new hospital entrance.

Stage 1 of the Pimlico Campus expansion project will be completed in 2020. Final planning for future stages of the Pimlico Campus expansion, which will include a multi-storey carpark are nearing completion.

The Mater first opened in Townsville in 1945 by the Sisters of Mercy and has served the people of Townsville continuously since. The values instilled in us by the Sisters of Mercy of Compassion, Justice, Excellence in Care and Mercy live on in the hospital today.

The Mater recognises its place in the community both as a not for profit quality health care provider and the largest private employer in the city and will continue to reinvest in its infrastructure and equipment to meet the growing health needs of the community.


Kari Arbouin / Associate Vice Chancellor – CQ University

I was in Sydney recently and was introduced to a retired GP. She asked me a number of questions which began to feel progressively interrogative: “How do you feel about depleting Australia’s economy through training students in regional areas when they would get a better education and experience if they relocated to a city?” she asked. She continued by saying that all regional universities should close and resources re-directed to building bigger universities in metros. I was shocked! I really haven’t come across this type of view before, even less from someone who I thought was ‘well-educated’.

Regional universities serve a critical purpose. Regions generally have higher under-served populations whose students often cannot afford to relocate for university. CQUniversity for example, is Australia’s largest regional university and is ranked second-highest in the sector for first-in-family participation. So, it goes without saying that the regions need quality education as much as, if not more than, the cities.

Part of a city’s growth trajectory is built on the skills and workforce of its community. We need local people who know our city to be that workforce. There may be few jobs for some professionals in large cities but there are vacancies for those critical jobs regionally, that locals will fill…and they will stay!

As our region’s economy changes and opportunities present themselves, we need our community to re-train and re-skill to support growth. This requires educational institutions in close proximity who understand that while studying is important, a student’s family may be their main priority and certainly a central ingredient of their support system. So too, is often maintaining their job while they re-train.

Finally regional areas have universities whose quality are comparable to their city counterparts (and we can prove this) and in many areas exceed the expertise and study conditions that over-crowded and jaded city universities may offer.

Take the student out of the region and we drain regions of Australia that collectively are the backbone of our economy. And that retired GP’s ‘Sydney life’ may not survive the consequences.

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